11 Quantitative Adjectives Examples and Expressions

11 Quantitative Adjectives Examples and Expressions





Quantitative Adjectives

Quantitative adjectives indicate quantity.

Some

Some are used with both countable and uncountable nouns, it means ‘ a few’ when it is used with countable nouns, and the noun after Quantitative adjectives is plural.

  • I hope my dad doesn’t forget to buy some potatoes when he comes home.
  • I have some friends in the village so I do not get bored.

Some means ‘a little’ when it is used with uncountable nouns and the noun is always singular:

  • There is some milk in the fridge, I will drink it before bed.
  • I gave my dad some money I saved to buy a computer.

Any

‘Any’ is used in both countable and countable nouns, but it can only be used in questions and negative sentences. When we use countable nouns it means ‘nothing’ and the noun after ‘any’ is plural.

  • There are not any apples in the fridge so I will eat a banana.
  • There are not any people at home so I will eat alone.





When used with uncountable nouns, these nouns are singular:

  • I do not have any money, I need to find a job.
  • I have not had any coffee today so I slept early.
  • Do you have any friends at school?
  • I need onions to cook, do you have any onions at home?

Much

Much is used only with uncountable nouns, and the sentence in which it is used is either a question sentence or a negative sentence.

– How much money do you have with you I will do the grocery shopping according to the money?

-I do not have much money this month.

  • He does not talk much, so I get bored with him.

Many

Many are used in negative sentences and question sentences and it is also used with countable nouns.

·         I have many students and I love all of them.

Another and Other

Although there is no difference between them in terms of meaning, the way they are used in the sentence is different. ‘Another’ is used with singular nouns while ‘other’ is used with plural nouns.

  • Let’s buy her another
  • Other dishes are on the top shelf.

A few

‘A few’ used in countable and plural nouns and it means little but sufficient.

  • I bought a few candies from the market.

Few

‘Few’ adds a negative meaning to the sentence and it means little but not enough.

  • There are few apples on the table so I can not eat.




A lot of

‘A lot of’ is used with both countable and uncountable nouns. When it is used with uncountable nouns, these nouns are singular but when it is used with counted nouns, the situation changes and these nouns become plural.

  • I drank lots of water while I was sweaty and then I got sick. (Water is an uncountable noun so it is singular)
  • I have a lot of books in my library because I love reading books. (The book is a countable noun, so it is plural)
  • Do you have a lot of pens?

Little

‘Little’  is used with uncountable nouns and it gives a negative meaning to the sentence.

  • There is little

A little

A little has some or very little meaning and it gives a positive meaning to the sentence.

  • There is a little water, we need to buy from the shop.

Add Comment